Notes on Product Management | Day in the Life of

Writing on this blog every day is all about sharing my learning journey. As a result, this has meant sharing lessons learnt on starting (and quitting) a non profit, on life in graduate business school, and, more recently, Saturday posts on parenting. So, I’m excited to commit to writing more regularly – I’m shooting for bi-weekly – about what I do at work as a Product Manager at LinkedIn.

While I expect to delve into topics unique to product management about half the time, I expect the other half to be about lessons learnt on approaching work better – running better meetings, managing managers, and so on. I hope you find it interesting/useful.

Today’s post tackles the “What is a day in the life a Product Manager” question.


“What is a day in the life of <insert role you’d like to learn more about>?” is a common question when you’re looking to learn more about a role in a particular company. It is a surprisingly powerful question as you aren’t expecting the person on the other side to open their calendar and rattle out their schedule for the day.

Instead, the question behind the question often tends to be – “What are the skills required to do what you do?” That turns out to be a difficult question to answer because the skills required to a job well are rarely covered on the job description. And, my journey to understanding the skills required for my job as an IC/individual contributor Product Manager involved drawing extensively on the 3 sources of learning – books/synthesized information, conversations with other product managers, and my own experiences – to map out the product creation machine and the skills required for each phase.

This is the “clean version” of that machine.

I say “clean version” because the reality looks something like this.

All this takes us back to where we began – “What are the skills required to be an IC Product Manager?” While the nature of their application varies depending on the type of product (B2B vs. B2C for instance), I think there are 4 core skills –

1) Problem finding: This is arguably both the most challenging and most important skill. We are educated in systems that teach us to solve problems, not find them. So, it takes time to unlearn our natural instinct to “dive in” and, instead, take a step back and really understand what problem we’re trying to solve and for whom.

2) Problem solving: Iterative problem solving is at the heard of the building process. This is when we aim to balance value with usability and feasibility. We always have fewer resources than we’d like and this skill helps us make the trade-offs necessary to get a product out of the door.

3) Selling: I’ve intentionally chosen to use the word “selling” instead of the more common “influencing” because selling is a massive part of the job. We are always selling the value of our product – internally, externally, upward, downward, and sideways. Realizing this was a game changer for me. The other powerful learning that accompanied this was realizing how much of the selling I did was written.

4) Building effective teams: Great products are built by teams. Great products aren’t always built by great teams. But, great teams are always at the heart of great product building experiences. We don’t always get to build great products (they require luck and timing among other factors) – but we can choose to always create great building experiences.

More on all of this to follow on future posts in the series.