Building reputation and incentives into marketplace products | Thinking Product

This is a “Thinking Product” post where I have more outstanding notes questions than concrete thoughts or a framework. I haven’t given the subject of reputation in marketplaces much thought. But, I thought about reputation this week as I took four Uber rides during a day of travel. The driver side of the marketplace. I read … Continue reading Building reputation and incentives into marketplace products | Thinking Product

Sending audios and optimizing flows | Thinking Product

I wanted to send a friend an audio message on iOS. The flow started straight forward. First, I pressed the mic button on the side of the message. Next, I record the message. I liked the user experience (Ux) here as it clearly separates finishing an audio, playing it and sending it. Whatsapp, for example, … Continue reading Sending audios and optimizing flows | Thinking Product

Connecting aspects of great products and great product strategy | Thinking Product

I started the Thinking Product series by sharing my hypotheses for the 3 core aspects of great technology products and great product strategy. This evolving theory, like all theories, is necessarily imperfect. There’s a ton of nuance that goes into building technology products – e.g., products for enterprises and consumers are designed very differently. But, … Continue reading Connecting aspects of great products and great product strategy | Thinking Product

Retention – feat the tragedy of the commons | Thinking Product

There are two questions to ask when we think of retaining users  – Are we continuing to drive value for our users via continuous improvement or better surfacing of value? Are we reminding users of the value they can drive? Both these questions are important but drive contrasting approaches. The first question focuses on improvements … Continue reading Retention – feat the tragedy of the commons | Thinking Product

The dark side of engagement | Thinking Product

Today’s post, on retention, was supposed to be the final one in the “building blocks” series where we bring together the various aspects of great technology products and the questions that can guide our thinking through this process. But, before I spent time on retention, I thought I’d take a detour and share a few … Continue reading The dark side of engagement | Thinking Product

Onboarding – Converting new users to power users | Thinking Product

The best definition I’ve come across for the purpose of a great onboarding flow is – onboarding converts new users to power users. Connecting aspects of great products to strategy again, the growth portion of the strategy targets users who would hire your product to get a job done. The purpose of the onboarding flow … Continue reading Onboarding – Converting new users to power users | Thinking Product

Getting stickiness right | Thinking Product

My hypothesis is that great products have 3 characteristics. 1. Nail job-to-be-done: They are a great solution to a problem users care about 2. Delight to use: They are well designed 3. Sticky: Makes the customer/user want to come back I wrote about nailing the job-to-be-done and delight to use characteristics in the last 2 weeks. Today, we’ll explore stickiness. … Continue reading Getting stickiness right | Thinking Product

Delight to use and The Economist Espresso – Thinking Product

My hypothesis is that great products have 3 characteristics. 1. Nail job-to-be-done: They are a great solution to a problem users care about 2. Delight to use: They are well designed 3. Sticky: Makes the customer/user want to come back Last week, I wrote about nailing the job-to-be-done. Today, we’ll take a quick look at what it means … Continue reading Delight to use and The Economist Espresso – Thinking Product

Jobs-to-be-done and Munchkin spoons – Thinking Product

My hypothesis is that great products have 3 characteristics – 1. Nail job-to-be-done: They are a great solution to a problem users care about 2. Delight to use: They are well designed 3. Sticky: Makes the customer/user want to come back I thought I’d start by digging into the idea of nailing job-to-be-done. And, to do that, I … Continue reading Jobs-to-be-done and Munchkin spoons – Thinking Product